ULI Louisiana News

November 2018 Member Spotlight: Annie Cambria

ULI:

You were recently awarded the prestigious ULI Women’s Leadership Initiative Prologis Scholarship to attend the ULI Fall Meeting – can you tell us about your experience last month in Boston?

ACC:

This was my first time attending a ULI Fall Meeting and it was a great experience. I generally find conferences to be great for either networking or quality content, but the ULI Fall Meeting provided both. In addition to spending more time with fellow ULI Louisiana members, the highlight of the meeting was attending the Public Development and Infrastructure Product Council. We heard first hand from the major players of two innovation districts (including Governor Dukakis) – one in Kendall Square that was developed through partnerships with MIT, and another, newer district in Boston’s Seaport. The presentations and field exploration covered all aspects of the history, implementation and current status of what it really takes to make an innovation district not only possible but successful. Being able to explore two very different districts each with very diverse circumstances was incredibly insightful, especially in light of the current work in progress with New Orleans’ Bio District.

 ULI:

How did you first become involved with ULI?

ACC:

I don’t recall the exact moment, but I think it began when I started attending some of the local panels on topics of interest and went on some building tours. Then about three years ago, John Huppi reached out to me to teach the ULI Urban Plan curriculum for Tulane’s Undergraduate Real Estate Minor. I’ve taught that program over the past two summers, and have recently started training the volunteers needed to facilitate the programming in other ULI Councils across the country. Participating in Urban Plan on a national level has been a great way to see how other local ULI councils operate and I enjoy having the opportunity to help shape the Urban Plan program, which is always evolving. I hope to host a training in Baton Rouge this Spring to help grow LSU’s new Urban Plan program in their business school.

 ULI:

You also served on Mayor Cantrell’s economic development transition team – what do you feel is the most important thing that can positively impact the city for the next 4 years?

ACC:

While certainly more than just a 4-year project, we have to start to deal with our outdated and broken water management infrastructure. We have the opportunity to turn a crumbling system into a world-class model and become the go-to place for urban leaders to learn about living with water. This impacts aspects of everyone’s life, from day-to-day worries whenever it rains too hard, to the ability of the city to attract and grow Fortune 500 businesses. Given the flooding we have seen in all parts of the world we must address this issue head-on and make proverbial lemonade out of lemons. Otherwise, none of our children will be able to live here in 50 years (no matter what else happens). I’ve heard this described as New Orleans’ moon shot, and I couldn’t agree more.

 ULI:

How do you encourage your students to become involved with ULI at Tulane University?

ACC:

I always encourage them to become ULI student members – the student rate is a great deal! I focus on the possibility of making a connection that might lead to employment after graduation. I encourage them to attend the local events, and to get to know fellow members. I generally offer to make introductions if there is a particular member or industry area a student is interested in learning more about.

ULI:

What’s the one thing you miss about living in New York?

ACC:

Great public transit. And excellent, authentic food from all over the world delivered to your doorstop. I guess that’s two.

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